» » Norman Cook - D.J. Mega-Mix Vol. 1

Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 The Finest Ingredients (Radio Mix Part 1) 5:00
A2 The Finest Ingredients (Radio Mix Part 2)
Featuring [Uncredited] – Wildski*
3:00
B1 The Finest Ingredients (Club Mix Part 1) 5:00
B2 The Finest Ingredients (Club Mix Part 2)
Featuring [Uncredited] – Wildski*
3:00

Notes

Limited Edition
For Promotion Only

Despite the different mix names, the Radio Mix & Club Mix are the same versions.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout: MM001A RADIO
  • Matrix / Runout: MM001B CLUB


Norman Cook - D.J. Mega-Mix Vol. 1

Musician performer: Norman Cook

Title: D.J. Mega-Mix Vol. 1

Date of release: 1986

Style: Cut-up/DJ, Electro

Genre: Electronic / Hip hop

Size MP3: 1339 mb

Size FLAC: 1621 mb

Rating: 4.3 / 5

Votes: 750

Other Formats: WAV APE TTA MP3 MP1 VOX DMF


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Jozrone
Hilarious that this dope 12" came out the same year he joined the fucking Housemartins! Talk about hedging your bets...
Jozrone
Hilarious that this dope 12" came out the same year he joined the fucking Housemartins! Talk about hedging your bets...
BeatHoWin
This record was really well ahead of it's time! This was released when Norman Cook (Fatboy Slim), was still in Indie group The Housemartins, and this influenced hundreds of turntablist cut-cup records (such as Coldut's Beats + Pieces). The reason this never got released was due to the heavy amount of samples in it (dialogue from Doctor Who, Batman, The Jungle Book, and lots of familiar bronx breaks samples), and got bootlegged to death (under the name of Norman Housemartin!). On to the record itself. In my ears, the main part sounds a heck of a lot like the Inspector Gadget theme, and Norm incorporates loops of him doing some turntablism (a thing that he almost dosen't do nowerdays), and the other side features the same track, but with Norm himself rapping (badly) with future Beats International member, MC Wildski! Overall, if anyone can find it, it's definatly worth it as this (along with Double Dee and Steinski's Lesson's series), is one of the most influential cut and paste records ever.
BeatHoWin
This record was really well ahead of it's time! This was released when Norman Cook (Fatboy Slim), was still in Indie group The Housemartins, and this influenced hundreds of turntablist cut-cup records (such as Coldut's Beats + Pieces). The reason this never got released was due to the heavy amount of samples in it (dialogue from Doctor Who, Batman, The Jungle Book, and lots of familiar bronx breaks samples), and got bootlegged to death (under the name of Norman Housemartin!). On to the record itself. In my ears, the main part sounds a heck of a lot like the Inspector Gadget theme, and Norm incorporates loops of him doing some turntablism (a thing that he almost dosen't do nowerdays), and the other side features the same track, but with Norm himself rapping (badly) with future Beats International member, MC Wildski! Overall, if anyone can find it, it's definatly worth it as this (along with Double Dee and Steinski's Lesson's series), is one of the most influential cut and paste records ever.
Tyler Is Not Here
this was not ahead of its time - coldcut were influenced by steinski and other american cut'n'paste records ... i doubt very much if this influenced anyone!
Tyler Is Not Here
this was not ahead of its time - coldcut were influenced by steinski and other american cut'n'paste records ... i doubt very much if this influenced anyone!
Punind
This is the absolutely first record produced by Norman Cook. In that time (1986) he was still member of 80's pop-combo 'The Housemartins'. It didn't get released officially because of the amount of samples in it. In spite of that the rest of the Housemartins demanded that Norman should distance himself from the track as it undermined the band's own image and ideology.
Punind
This is the absolutely first record produced by Norman Cook. In that time (1986) he was still member of 80's pop-combo 'The Housemartins'. It didn't get released officially because of the amount of samples in it. In spite of that the rest of the Housemartins demanded that Norman should distance himself from the track as it undermined the band's own image and ideology.
MrDog
They really were a bunch of boring bastards weren't they?
MrDog
They really were a bunch of boring bastards weren't they?